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Fistulectomy

What is Fistulectomy?

Fistulectomy is the process of surgical removal of a fistula, it is also called syringectomy.

What is a Fistula?


A fistula is the name given to an abnormal connection between two organs or blood vessels which are not commonly connected. Fistulas can develop in a wide variety of positions all over the body. For demonstration, a fistula can evolve between the stomach and duodenum, or between the rectum and the exterior of the skin. Fistulas can evolve for a variety of causes, depending on the location of the fistula. Rectal and anal fistulas, for example, are most routinely initiated by bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Fistulas may evolve as a difficulty of certain types of surgery, or as a result of traumatic personal injury.

How is a fistulectomy performed?


If your child has a perirectal fistula, a fistulectomy may be recommended to lastingly eliminate the treatment of fistula. Throughout this Procedure the fistula is removed through a small incision into the edge of the anus with the abscess. This is an operation that is finished as an outpatient and takes less than one hour. After the procedure, your kid can go home as shortly as he or she is aroused and adept to drink fluids. The incision that is made during the fistulectomy is left open and not shut with stitches. This open wound will mend and close by itself in one to two weeks. While the area is healing, no infection will happen in the wound, even though your child has bowel movements. You can help hold the locality clean by giving your child a moderately hot bathing tub after every bowel action. An antibiotic is not needed at this time. In most appendectomy operations, there is very little blood loss. Your kid will obtain blood only in the rare case of a farthest emergency. If you desire to supply a directed donation of blood, communicate the hospital, 1-2 weeks in advance of the Treatment Procedure.

Perianal Fistulectomy


This method is finished in the hospital on an outpatient clinic utilizing a general anesthetic. The procedure is done to remove a perianal fistula that can form after somebody evolves a perianal abscess. The fistula may form 4-6 weeks or even a year after the initial abscess. Fifty per hundred of abscesses will develop a fistula. There are 3 significant components of a fistula to recognize prior to or at the beginning of the surgery. The external opening, which is generally conspicuous round the anal opening on the outside, the tract, which is the attachment between the external and the interior openings, and the interior opening, which is not habitually apparent until during the surgery. Sometimes a blue dye is injected into the external opening to allow identification of the interior opening at the time of surgery. The fistulectomy comprises of removing or open the 3 components. This is always done by splitting up the least amount of the sphincter muscle as likely but yet permitting a therapy of the fistula, thereby minimizing any leakage or drainage after surgery Procedure. The position of the interior opening will usually dictate how much of the sphincter muscle will be slashed or divided. The farther up inside the anal canal or rectum the interior opening is located, the more muscle will have to be incised or cut through, premier to more of a risk of leakage or drainage after the wound has mended. One time the fistula has been taken, the groove or wound is left open to granulate in. The granulation or healing method generally takes 4-6 weeks. The surgery Procedure takes approx. 45-60 minutes. Pain medication and antibiotics will be granted at release. There will be some post-op office visits required. Some fistulas can be very complicated and may need more than 1 surgery.

Homecare After Surgery


If the abscess is drained by the surgeon, we suggest that your care at home include moderately hot bathing tubs after each bowel action foe recovery. This will clean and soothe the area while it is healing. The physician may furthermore prescribe antibiotics for the patient after surgery treatment. Fistulectomy incisions are left open and not closed with stitches. This open wound will mend and close by itself in one to two weeks. While the locality is healing, no infection will happen in the wound, even though your child has bowel movements. You can help hold the locality clean by giving your child a moderately hot bathing tub after every bowel action. An antibiotic is not needed at this time.

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